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January 25, 2019 administrator

The end-of-year Farm Bill passed in December of 2018 brought with it the re-legalization of a crop that has not been on the U.S. Government’s approved list since 1937. Hemp, the non-intoxicating cousin of the oft-maligned marijuana, has returned to the country’s list of approved substances. The lumping of hemp with marijuana was not an uninformed accident; it was a calculated smear campaign by a number of industries struggling to compete with the hemp market. As we return to using hemp close to a century later, there are potentials for profit estimated to be in the tens of billions by 2025. The first clues on where these profits will lie can be found at this story’s beginning.

Hemp versus Marijuana: What is the Difference?

A bit of an explanation must preface the tale, as the difference between these plants is a major part of the story. Both hemp and marijuana are in the Cannabis family. For those who like Latin names, hemp is Cannabis sativa, while marijuana is Cannabis indica. These species are still considered larger classification groups and are often broken down into further subspecies; anyone who goes to a marijuana dispensary or recreational shop like Euflora will get a variety of subspecies options.

For non-scientists, these are different species that are closely related (close enough to be cross-bred. They look similar, and it has not been uncommon to refer to hear someone refer to marijuana as hemp. Hemp and marijuana have some growth differences, as one is valued for its leaves and the other the fibers in its woody stalks. The key difference to note here is the lack of THC in hemp. Though not an intoxicant, it does contain other compounds in common with its sister species, like CBD.

The 1937 Marihuana Tax Act and Why it Matters Now

Both hemp and marijuana were originally banned during the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act. This bill was prepared in secret and passed through a series of misinformation campaigns. This bill has been considered to be racist, scientifically baseless, and a power grab to knock hemp competition from several markets. The key players in the tale give us some clues as to the real motivations behind the story.

Prior to the illegal status on the crop, hemp was one of the most important cash crops for U.S. farmers. Today, it is estimated to have over 50,000 uses. Even at the turn of last century, hemp was an incredibly powerful product. The fibers in hemp are stronger than any plant-based material and were stronger than anything else known at the time. It made superior paper that didn’t yellow, rope, and better fabric than cotton (with less labor and maintenance required). The oil in hemp was edible, burnable, and medicinal. It was a staple in diets, pharmacies, and early attempts at combustion engines. The original diesel engine made by Rudolf Diesel burned hemp oil.

The beginning of industrialization also saw the beginning of big business and the attempt to control competition and supply chains to maximize profit streams. In the late years of the Great Depression, these companies needed a competitive advantage to stay solvent. Removing hemp from the marketplace became that win.

There were several key players in this act, all of whom saw to profit from the banning of hemp from the marketplace. A group of business interests that were led by DuPont petrochemical company teamed up with Andrew Mellon, the Secretary of the Treasury under Harding and a major interest in Gulf Oil. The final player was Randolph Hearst, who owned a newspaper empire and a timber company that competed against hemp for paper production.

Though Hearst’s papers, a smear campaign was created. What was then called yellow journalism (named, ironically, for the yellow wood-based paper that was considered substandard to hemp paper) and is now called fake news was sent out to demonize the party drug, marihuana. The name was simply the Spanish word for hemp, and was intentionally used to make it seem foreign and scary as well as to prevent people from understanding the staple crop they would be opposing. No distinction was made between the two products. The ban was successful until its repeal at the end of 2018.

The Return of Hemp: Where are the Profits?

Whether you are a homesteader or an investor, there are savings and investment opportunities available in the hemp market. Here are some of the places where hemp will have a strong showing in the marketplace:

Petrochemical Products

DuPont had good reason to want hemp out of production. At the time of the ban, they were just about to take their patent for Nylon public. Fabric made from hemp was a stronger fiber that was cheaper to produce. It was also biodegradable. They also made a number of chemical additives for petroleum gasoline, which was competing with biomass and plant-oil fuels in the newly created automobile industry.

Hemp will likely have a strong future in biofuel technologies. Compostable bioplastics will also be likely to incorporate hemp. Of course, hemp fabric is another thing that has already returned to specialty markets and is likely to become a more mainstream option in the coming years.

Paper

The paper industry is hurting some thanks to the advent of electronic reading, but a specialty market still exists. However, the surge of online purchases has also made the paper market for packaging materials (think Amazon boxes) make up for some of the profit loss. In addition to creating stronger paper that requires fewer processing chemicals, hemp can be grown on the same plot of land year after year. This requires a smaller land use footprint than that of timber pulp. This is a plus for eco-conscious buyers and wild land advocates alike.

Pharmaceuticals

The use of medical marijuana has been well-documented. Retail stores like Euflora will offer a number of different product options made from marijuana to deal with pain, anxiety, nausea and other ailments. Unfortunately, because marijuana is classified as a Schedule 1 drug federally, these products have so far only been available to those who lived in states with recreational or medical marijuana laws in place. Even then, the cost of these medications are not legally allowed to be covered by insurance, even when they are more effective, less harmful and less expensive overall than other prescription options on the market.

The legalization of hemp, in this industry, will open the door to the use of non-THC compounds shared in both plants. CBD oil, a compound called cannabidiol that has had a lot of press in the years leading up to the return of hemp, is one product found in both plants that will likely see a surge in use. The removal of CBD from the Schedule 1 drug list will also make it possible for distribution across state lines and use in non-dispensary locations like coffee shops, restaurants and health food stores.

The final, and perhaps largest, benefit for the legalization to the pharmaceutical industries is that it opens up the full gamut of funding opportunities for research. Until now, the gray area of being legal in a state but illegal federally has closed the door on grant funding and many business loan opportunities. Businesses looking to create innovative products have had to rely on private, and often expensive, loan sources. Access to the free market of money lending and the lower, more competitive rates that come with it can only help to drive innovation here.

Textiles and Fiberboards

Two of the largest growth opportunities for hemp that are already in process include the textile and fiberboard markets. Auto industries are looking for an alternative to fiberglass, and prototype hemp panels have been found to be strong, durable, and easy to manufacture. Hemp-based fabrics have been shown to be UV-resistant (unlike cotton) and hypoallergenic. As consumers learn more about the unintended consequences of microplastics from plastic clothing breakdowns and the effect of sunscreen chemicals on critical habitats like coral, these fabrics will have even more appeal.

Personal Care Products

Hemp oils have been a staple of natural beauty products for some time. Prior to legalization, it was possible to import sterilized seeds, oils, and processed hemp products in the U.S. as manufacturing products but not to grow them domestically or process anything on U.S. soil using stems, leaves, or non-sterilized seeds. The repeal of the rule means that the import cost of hemp oils has disappeared, and the market for small cottage industries will grow. Expect a large farm-to-beauty upswing in farmer’s markets and buy-local venues nationwide when it comes to hemp-based beauty markets.

Agriculture

With tariffs on corn and soybeans hurting the U.S. Agricultural market, the boon to farmers was one of the main reasons that hemp legalization was given bipartisan support in congress, even from those who still oppose legal marijuana use. As a plant that doesn’t have tariffs and that requires fewer resources to grow compared to other products, there is a lot of upside for the farmer.

Hemp has a high product-to-acreage ratio, which means that you get a large crop compared to the amount of land that you farm. Cotton requires about twice the land, for example, as hemp to produce the same amount of textile product. Cotton takes twice the water to grow compared to hemp, which needs 20-30 inches of rain during the growing season to forego irrigation completely. When you factor in the water requirements of processing, hemp’s advantage over cotton only increases. You can go from seed to shirt with a mere quarter of the water consumption. Similar studies are sure to come soon when comparing it to corn and soybean products.

Homesteading and Hemp: Saving through DIY

A lot was said about the investor marketplace and production side of hemp as the bill gained popularity. There is, however, another money-saving reason that this plant will be a cost-saver. For the DIY and homesteader sets, hemp is a triple threat. It is easy to grow, it has multiple uses, and many of the products are simple to manufacture yourself. This is one of the major reasons why it was a staple crop on farms nationwide prior to the ban.

Fibers

Fibers from the woody hemp stems can be dried and pounded. Wool and hemp clothing were more common than cotton in pre-manufacturing days because neither required a factory to produce with some efficiency. A return to hemp fiber processing will likely bring with it some innovative new products for home fiber extraction and weaving and a slew of DIY tutorials.

Food

In addition to the manufacturing and medicinal advantages of hemp seed and hemp seed oil, both are edible sources of Omega-3. This allows for a nutrient-rich diet source that is easy to grow and use. While the levels of beneficial alkaloids like CBD are not distilled and purified, there is an underlying level of the chemical in any hemp food product. Hemp milk, a favorite newcomer to the latte shops, is also easy to make at home with some cheesecloth and a YouTube video.

Energy

For those who want to live electrically off the grid, hemp oil continues to be a good way to generate your own electricity. Diesel generators can be fitted to run off hemp oils grown in your own backyard. They can also be burned as candles or in oil lamps for light. This not only offers a home-grown fuel source, it means cleaner air with fewer combustion byproducts.

Just the Beginning

Now that hemp has the green light for product development, manufacturing and distribution, there is little doubt that markets for hemp products will explode. In addition to the places where hemp once dominated the market and likely will again, there are a lot of promising new technologies that may not have been considered. Best of all, this is a product that has benefits for both big business and small cottage industries. There is no better time for the tragic tale of the hemp ban to get its happy ending.


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January 4, 2019 administrator

With the ever expanding use cases of cannabis, from medical to industrial, a company in the Netherlands has built a prefab house… entirely out of cannabis!

The company, Dunagro,  has been developing a house made from hemp concrete (a mixture of hemp wood, natural glue and water), since 2009. Hemp, the non-THC variety of the cannabis plant has long been known to be useful in a myriad of applications that are both environmentally sustainable, fast growing, and cost efficient. From food to clothing to bio-fuel hemps uses continue to develop and that pace should speed up exponentially since it’s recent legalization in the USA.

 

Last November, Dun Agro put its hemp home on display. The company has already completed its second hemp home and has plans to build and sell more in the near future. In fact, with the present output of hemp in the Netherlands, the company estimates it can produce up to 500 hemp houses per year. If the demand increases, that number can easily be scaled up.

According to the company (translated to english):

“With this hemp house we show that, among other things through the use of innovative techniques, hemp building is a serious alternative to the sustainability of regular housing, also in terms of costs.”

 


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December 14, 2018 administrator

In 2016 the cannabis market in the United States was estimated to be worth over 7.6 billion dollars. Based on current trends from the US Bureau of Labor, this industry is expected to add over 300,000 jobs to the United States by the year 2025. This is especially important in this day and age–where automation is replacing workers at an alarming rate.

The legalization of cannabis is expected to create a wide variety of new economic opportunities. This industry is one of the fastest growing in the United States and it is predicted to employ more people in 2020 than the entire manufacturing industry. Some of the jobs will be for positions that are directly related to the industry–such as growers, harvesters, technicians, quality control managers, and chemists but there will also be job growth in related industries that are impacted by the industry. This includes jobs such as truck drivers, cashiers, marketers, accountants, human resource professionals, accountants, general managers, and web developers.

Due to this increased demand, there has been a recent surge in training programs that are tailed to finding a job in the cannabis industry. Many states now offer a marijuana worker license for professionals who want to work in the industry. Because of the wide variety of jobs that are related to this industry, it will be easier for someone to find a position that is well suited to his or her unique skill set. This can help to benefit new job seekers who are looking to get established in a growing field.

Besides the creation of new jobs, the legalization of cannabis for recreational usage in more states is also expected to impact the economy in several other ways. With less resistance against legalization, there is expected to a bigger push to have cannabis legalized nationwide. This is expected to create a significant increase in investment opportunities as more companies are allowed to be registered on the public stock exchange. Investment in weed stocks is predicted to grow faster than average due to how new this sector is compared to other sectors in the market. When they first became public, many Canadian weed stocks had a trading volume that was higher than average when compared to other industries during their opening week. It is likely that there would be high interest in US cannabis companies if they were ever able to follow suit.

Along with creating more investment opportunities–another significant contribution to the economy from the cannabis industry would come through the tax revenue that is generated from sales. One reason why this would be such a big deal is because people would now be able to buy cannabis from a legal source instead of purchasing it off the black market. California alone collected over 3 billion dollars from sales taxes during 2017. If marijuana was legalized nationwide the taxes from sales are estimated to amount to over 138 billion dollars.

A lot of money would also be saved from the costs that are associated with the criminalization of using cannabis. Several billion dollars could be saved every year from the costs and fees of imprisoning people who are issued drug charges for using cannabis. Several countries, such as Canada, have changed the law to make illegal possession or usage of marijuana to be a civil crime rather than a criminal charge. This helps to generate money in fees and it eases the burden on the criminal justice system because it decreases the amount of people who are jailed for minor offenses. This also helps many people to avoid having a charge on their criminal record–which can make it more difficult for people to find jobs years after they are charged with the offense.

There have been statements from many police officers who support the legalization of marijuana because they feel like there is too much time and effort that is wasted on nonviolent crimes. Some officers have said that this wastes taxpayer money and that it can hinder them by preventing them from focusing on more serious crimes.

As of late, cannabis has been legalized in over 25 states. This includes the use of medical marijuana in 33 states and the recreational usage in 10 states. It is expected to become legalized in more states as the push to decriminalize weed has grown among the younger generation. At least 7 more states are projected to legalize at least partial use of the drug and more are expected to allow more casual usage of the drug.

Legalization of cannabis has become a more popular topic recently after Canada became the second G2 nation after Denmark to legalize marijuana. But despite how well-known Denmark is as a tourist spot for cannabis users, the first nation to legalize the use of cannabis was actually Uruguay.

Under the initial law that was passed in Uruguay, pharmacies were allow to sell marijuana to citizens who were of legal age for purchase. Citizens were also allow to register to a cannabis club and were allowed under certain restrictions to grow their own marijuana. There have been issues with demand for the drug outpacing the supply. This has pushed the prices of cannabis in Uruguay up to about $2.50 per gram. Part of the problem is that the distribution methods were limited to pharmacies rather allowing cannabis to be sold in more general stores.

In Canada the sale of cannabis is limited to specific stores and the legal age to buy the drug is dependent on the territory where it is bought. Lawmakers hope that legalization will help to curb the use of the drug among minors by making it more normalized and less like a forbidden fruit. Another major reason for the legalization of cannabis for casual use is that it will make help regulate the production of the drug in order to make sure that the quality of the drug is up to standards. This would help reduce the risk that comes with buying the drug off the streets because it would now come from a known source.

In 2014, Colorado became the first state in the US where cannabis was legalized for recreational use. Purchase of marijuana within the state is restricted to adults who are 21 or over and is limited to 28 grams within a single transaction. The store hours for which cannabis is allowed to be sold are dependent upon which county the store operates in. Any store that is planning on selling marijuana must be licensed to do so. There are currently many restrictions on how cannabis can be advertised. In most states ads for cannabis are limited to specific forms of media and are not allowed to be shown on public television or radio stations. This is done in order to prevent companies from trying to target minors.

Along with the sale of marijuana, there are laws that restrict the concentration of THC that can be found in your blood when driving. Because of this, it is best to be remain aware of when you lasted smoked or injected a substance whenever you plan on operating a vehicle. It is illegal to transport cannabis across state borders in the United States so be aware of each states laws on weed. In Colorado, minors who are caught in possession of cannibals are given a civil charge instead of a criminal charge.

But Colorado is not the only state that is known for this industry. Recreational usage of weed is currently legal in 9 other states. These include Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont, Michigan, and Alaska. One big push for the legalization of cannabis occurred in December of 2018, when the bipartisan farm bill was passed. This allowed for the production and usage of marijuana that did not contain THC.

Along with creating more economic opportunities–the legalization of marijuana has created the demand for entertainment facilities that are catered to cannabis usage such as coffee bars, lounges, and nightclubs. This has helped to create new local businesses, each with their own rules for what is permitted. Some of them only allow smoking indoors while others have an outdoor space that is set aside for cannabis users. These hangout spots have helped to provide jobs and many of them cater to tourists that come to the city. A relatively high amount of cannabis purchases in cities like Denver still come from people who are from out of state.

There has recently been more debate about whether or not cannabis delivery services should be permitted in cities where the recreational usage of marijuana is legal. The largest barriers to this are uncertainties over how delivery companies would be regulated and concerns over the verification process of sales that are made from door to door. Proponents think that this would make it easier for people who have a difficult time leaving the house to have easier access to cannabis products. This could help people who rely on marijuana for pain relief such as older consumers or people who have a chronic illness that restricts their mobility. It would also help to create new jobs for delivery drivers. Jobs like this would be great for people who need flexible part-time work.


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November 9, 2018 administrator

As cannabis becomes legal and more socially acceptable worldwide, a growing number of people are using it for both recreational and medicinal reasons. The fastest growing demographic to embrace marijuana, surprisingly, is elderly Baby Boomers.

Baby Boomers: A Growing Market for Cannabis

The reasons for seniors to use marijuana are many. They are the first generation of elderly Americans to have grown up with marijuana as a common recreational drug. With cannabis now legalized or at least decriminalized in many areas, they can finally indulge without fear of repercussions.

In addition, the golden years bring new freedom from drug tests and other employment-related barriers to cannabis use. Our newest batch of senior citizens has plenty of time and money to enjoy marijuana and few good reasons to just say no.

Last, the health benefits of medical marijuana are particularly attractive to this age group. Many of them are beginning to deal with age-related complaints such as joint pain, glaucoma, and other medical problems that cannabis is known to alleviate. In an age where other pain medications are increasingly difficult to get, marijuana may be the best non-prescription alternative.

Decreased Stigma for All Ages

The elderly Americans using cannabis in growing numbers are not new to the drug. The first waves of hippies are now in their seventies or older. Many of them have enjoyed marijuana in the distant past.

However, there was a stigma regarding cannabis use until very recently. People who smoked it were viewed as stoners. Many workplaces tested for THC routinely. Smoking pot could land you in criminal courts, family courts, and a variety of difficult situations.

As a result, many Boomers gave up marijuana when they settled into families and careers. However, this generation is not convinced by the scare tactics that kept previous cohorts from using cannabis en masse. In many cases, senior cannabis use is more of a homecoming than an experiment.

In a society increasingly accepting of recreational marijuana use, these reasons not to enjoy cannabis have dissipated like, well, smoke. There are no longer career consequences or undercover cops to fret about. Nothing stands between our seniors and the high they once craved.

In addition, the new availability of upscale smoking supplies appeals especially to baby boomers. The range of aesthetically appealing vape pens and specialty cannabis products gives cannabis use the feeling of a hobby meant for connoisseurs, similar to collecting fine wine or Cuban cigars.

A Geriatric Healthcare Revolution

The purported health benefits of cannabis are another oft-cited reason for the increase in use among seniors. The generation of flower children and Woodstock is far less likely to place their faith in pharmaceuticals than a natural herb.

A study in 2016 found that seniors in states that decriminalized medical marijuana are receiving fewer prescriptionsfor drugs that treat chronic pain, depression, and anxiety, and other chronic complaints that cannabis is believed to treat. Cannabis may soon have a secondary benefit of decreasing the growing cost of Medicare Part D.

Although marijuana has not been conclusively proven to help many of the ailments it is purported to treat, it is increasingly preferred over prescription drugs. This is particularly true of opioid pain medication. The American Medical Association reported last year that opioid prescriptions drop 14% in the year after a state legalizes medical marijuana. Even people who remain uncomfortable with marijuana use tend to prefer it over the negative societal and health effects of opioids.

There was a time when grandmothers all over the nation took a handful of pills every day to treat a laundry list of conditions. Today’s grandma may instead take an edible or smoke a joint.

Considering that even the best pharmaceuticals have side effects, it is hard to see this change as a negative one. The opioid crisis remains one of our nation’s top public health problems. Most of the health concerns associated with marijuana disproportionately affect young people and growing brains.

A Growing Market

Senior citizens are becoming an unlikely yet red hot market for businesses that offer cannabis products. Several edible companies such as Colorado-based Wana Brands are creating products specifically for seniors, such as extended-release CBC capsules.

The world of legalized marijuana can be overwhelming to elderly people, many of whom last bought marijuana in a park in the seventies. Today’s dispensaries can have hundreds of products, from lotions to sprays to candies to dog treats. Many products boast a specific CBC to THC ratio, a new consideration when using cannabis as a medication.

Dispensaries are working hard to appeal to an older and more sophisticated client base. Dispensaries in California are offering shuttle buses and special senior citizen discounts to capture this market. Many dispensaries are appealing to this demographic by adopting a more sleek and professional appearance. The dispensaries favored by older Americans often feel more like an Apple Store than a head shop, with glass shelves and employees in business casual wear.

The Bottom Line on High Seniors

Social scientists and pharmaceutical companies ignore this trend at their peril. We do not yet know the long term consequences of a generation of stoned grandparents. We also do not know how marijuana use will affect pharmaceutical use and other medical costs over the long term.

In the meantime, corporate American appears to be planning for a generation of seniors who use cannabis the way previous generations used pills. Pharmaceutical companies are beginning to dabble in the marijuana game. Geriatricians and family doctors have been calling for increased research on cannabis use in the aged so they can give evidence-based recommendations to a growing number of patients who are interested.

There is no indication that this is a mere trend. Almost ten percent of Americans aged 50-64 years old use marijuana. For generations to come, marijuana may become more associated with grandparents than with teen stoners. This is a dramatic societal shift that could have huge effects on the way our nation views recreational drug use and the golden decades after retirement.


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October 21, 2018 administrator

Cannabis is often in the news. There is much written about it being illegal, legal, or medically legal. There are articles on how it grows and how to get it to grow better. There are articles on how it’s a drug and how it’s a medicine. However, the piece that is rarely reported on is the components of cannabis, including THC, and how they make the body work.

The Use of Chemical Compounds by Plants

If a plant creates a compound that does not directly contribute to its ability to grow and reproduce, then there is usually an indirect reason for its production. The two main reasons that a plant will use an indirect chemical is to deter predators or to encourage pollinators and/or seed spreaders. Predators can be deterred by something that tastes bad, or by something toxic to them. Pollinators are drawn to showy flowers, and seeds that are surrounded by yummy fruit can be pooped out and spread the location of the plant. The book The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan suggests that the chemical compound of certain plants was used to entice people to spread them as well. Though the compounds in cannabis were originally used, most likely, to discourage insect predators, their effects on people had enough of an effect to spread this plant worldwide.

Why Chemicals Have an Effect on the Body

A chemical can only work in locations where there are receptors for the chemical. Receptors are locations on the body where, if the right thing is plugged in, something will happen. Depending on which of the compounds are plugged in, it works like a set of instructions to the body to release certain hormones, bring in blood cells, or allow for different brain pathways to change the processing of current information (this can result in a high, pain relief, memory loss or something else, depending on the compound). They are similar to the charge ports on today’s electronic devices. To get them to work, you need to have the right shape of port on your cord. In this case, the cord is THC or one of the other cannabis chemical compounds. Looking at the medical reason for it is like examining this natural wiring. Cannabis has two kinds of chemical compounds, called terpenes and cannabinoids. Terpenes are responsible for the different smells of the cannabis strains, while cannabinoids are responsible for the medical effects, as well as the high. Here is a look at the chemicals that are contained in cannabis, their effect on the body, and why they work that way:

THC

The most well-known chemical compound in cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. There are two varieties, known as 9-THC and 8-THC. This compound is known for its high, and because of this, cannabis has a very unique history in the plant world. While most plants which are used by people will be bred for the size, color, or taste of an item, cannabis was instead bred for the concentration of this chemical in the plant. Hemp, A different strain, subspecies or species, depending on who you talk to, was bred instead for the fibrous consistency and oil content of the plant. This means that the current day cannabis strains may be very different than those which were originally discovered in locations like Ancient Egypt. This is most concentrated in the plant’s flower buds, though it can be found, along with other compounds, in every part of the plant.

How THC works in the body

THC has two different receptor site location types. The first is located in the brain, where type CB1 receptors live, and the second is on some of the immune organs, like the spleen and lymph nodes. These are called type CB2 receptors. In type CB1, the high is found. In type CB2, there is the ability to suppress immune system function.

What Does the Body use CB1 and CB2 Receptors For?
It is important to note that the body does not have receptors, usually, to take in outside chemicals. Instead, these are areas that are activated by the body’s natural hormones in times of need. The change in perception created by type CB1 receptors have been shown by the body to be a coping mechanism for times of undue stress. The body can activate these during times of crisis or extreme physical exertion, like childbirth, in order to keep the full memory of the event from creating PTSD responses. The nausea center of the brain can also be tempered by THC, allowing an easier reaction from chemotherapy. CB2 receptors are immune suppression locations. When the body is in the middle of an autoimmune attack, where it is killing itself to fight an unseen enemy such as an allergy, these receptors can slow down the response and keep it from doing too much damage to the body. Medically, this receptor can theoretically be used to protect the body from foreign objects like surgical pins and even transplanted organs.

Other compounds in Cannabis:

The pharmacological uses for many of the other cannabinols have been of increasing interest as the allowance of cannabis for medical purposes has become more mainstream. Dozens of these compounds exist with a multitude of properties. Here is a small sampling of them and their medicinal applications:

  • Cannabichromene: This is the second most abundant cannabinol compound in the body. It affects the CB1 receptors by stimulating neurogenesis, or brain growth and fights depression. Its use of the same receptors along the spine can be a pain reliever. By way of the CB2, swelling or edema can be reduced. For those with digestive fungal and bacterial overgrowth, it also has an antifungal and antibacterial component. This can be found in all plant parts, and usually must be chemically extracted to use as an isolated compound.
  • Cannabidiol (CBD): This antioxidant stimulates the seizure center of the brain to stop convulsive attacks. It also seems to have anti-tumor properties. This is a nonpsychotic compound (no high) found in many parts of both cannabis and hemp, and often utilized through the oil.

The many effects of the cannabis compounds on the body are just beginning to be discovered. The vast knowledge of cultivation techniques to increase THC levels, taste varieties and other effects can also be used to design medical-centric cannabis strains designed for more effective treatment of certain conditions. Already this is being done to creates strains of cannabis that don’t give the high but do contain the other medically significant compounds. This particular science is in its infancy, though the knowledge of pharmacology and specific medical effects of different compounds will surely make this one of the fastest growing sectors of the cannabis industry.

Sources:
Pollan, Michael: The Botany of Desire
http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=000640
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydrocannabinol
Onaivi, Emmanuel: The Biology of Cannabis
http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=000636
http://www.leafscience.com/2013/09/21/5-health-benefits-of-cannabichromene-cbc/
http://www.leafscience.com/2014/02/23/5-must-know-facts-cannabidiol-cbd/


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August 21, 2018 administrator

There are thousands of strains out there, each with unique characteristics and effects. If you’re new to marijuana, it can feel overwhelming! It doesn’t have to be though. With a little bit of basic knowledge and a willingness to try new things, exploring the world of weed strains can be a blast. There’s a few things to think about before you walk in the door to your favorite Euflora location.

What effect are you looking for?

This is maybe the most important question to ask yourself when you’re choosing a strain. Cannabis strains fall into three categories: indica, sativa, and hybrids. Generally, if you’re looking for a relaxing feeling, you’ll go for an indica. An easy way to remember that is an Indica will put you In Da Couch. Sativas are known for the opposite; they’ll energize you and uplift you. Then there are hybrid strains, that all fall somewhere in the middle. So if you’re looking for something that’s going to be great during the daytime, or maybe a party with lots of friends, you’ll be better off with a sativa. If you need something to chill you out at the end of the night, or maybe help you sleep, that’s when you’d pick an indica.

What aroma do you like?

Each cannabis strain has a different “terpene profile”. Terpenes are essential oils found in the cannabis plant that are responsible for the scent and taste of the strain. (Specific terpenes are also sought for medical benefits, but that’s info for a different post). So much of the cannabis experience has to do with aroma. Just like tasting food or wine, you don’t get the full effect unless you can smell it! For example, strains high in A-Pinene will be piney and slightly woody. Caryophyllene will have a spicy, peppery aroma. Prefer something that smells citrusy? Try a strain that has a high quantity of linalool. When picking a cannabis strain, Euflora believes that being able to smell the flower first is extremely important. That’s why all our strains are presented in open-air, plexiglass containers, (accompanied by a description and additional information on iPads.)

Use the budtenders

You don’t have to figure this out on your own. Use the advice of our budtenders! Euflora’s budtenders are pros, that’s why they’re on the team. They know the details of each and every strain (and every product) that we offer. Talk to the budtenders about the kind of effects you’re looking for, and the type of scents that attract you. They’ll be able to guide you towards the perfect strain.

Remember, it’s not a race! Take your time reading about the different strains, smelling them, and asking the friendly Euflora budtenders lots of questions. Picking the right strain is part of the experience. There’s no need to rush it, and there’s no high-pressure sales tactics used in Euflora stores. We want you to enjoy the process!


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July 17, 2018 administrator

Cannabis extracts (also sometimes referred to by the term “concentrates”) can be intimidating and confusing for the newcomer. There are many different types, and they go in and out of style. It seems like there’s always something fresh popping up on the market! But don’t worry, we’ve done some of the background work for you. Below we’ve written a list of commonly found extracts with definitions. Treat this as a primer, and don’t be afraid to chat with our friendly Euflora budtenders for more guidance!

 

Wax – Wax is an extremely popular concentrate for dabbing. It is made by blasting plant material with solvent. Then, the material is heated at a low temperature while it’s whipped. Cannabis wax looks a bit like Cool Whip, but is a bit crumbly. It looks tasty, but don’t eat it!

 

Budder – Budder is very similar to wax but has more moisture in it. It isn’t whipped as much as wax when it’s being made, and has a more malleable and oily consistency.

 

Live Resin – This amazing innovation is made similar to how you’d make budder or wax, except your starting material is fresh-frozen plant. The flavor and aroma with live resin is fantastic, and this type of extract really captures the spirit of the live plant that it was made from. Ranging in color from light amber to yellow-gold, it often has a shiny, wet look to it.

 

Shatter – Shatter is one of the most popular types of extracts available today, and we believe that’s at least partly due to the way it looks… like shattered pieces of stain glass! Typically created by blasting plant material with butane, the extraction process used to make shatter removes the lipids and fats from the substance.

 

CO2 Oil – C02 oil is a type of concentrate that’s become popular over the years. It is viewed as a more natural substance since it’s made using C02 (which, of course, is a substance that occurs naturally and is produced by the human body). C02 oil is made with pressure and carbon dioxide to separate plant material. The finished product is usually an amber-colored oil. Typically, you’ll find C02 oil in vape cartridges.

 

Crumble – The process for making crumble is a lot like the way shatter is made, but the oils used to make crumble usually have a thicker consistency and more moisture, which contributes to giving this concentrate its cheese-like, crumbly body. When making crumble, lower heat is used (compared to shatter) which preserves more of the terpenes.

 

Bubble hash – You don’t see it as often as you used to, but bubble hash is still popular with DIYers and the slightly older crowd. Using ice water to separate plant matter from the THC, bubble hash can be mixed into joints, crumbled over a bowl, or even smoked by itself.

 

Rosin – Rosin has been around for as long as people have been smoking cannabis. In some parts of the world it’s the dominant method of consumption. Considered to be one of the most natural types of extracts, all it takes to create rosin is pressure and heat. Folks at home even make their own rosin with hair straighteners or tortilla presses! It usually has the appearance of amber-yellow sap.

 

Consider the above list to be just a primer. The cannabis concentrates world is deep and varied, and there is always something new to try. Don’t be intimidated! Our friendly budtenders will help you navigate, just stop by any Euflora location to get started!


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June 1, 2018 administrator
Phone: (970) 925-6468

We are extremely excited to announce that we have opened our 6th retail location in the mountain community of Aspen. We decided it was a good time to join the Aspen community, and bring the legendary Euflora experience and customer service to both locals and the many people that come from all over the world to visit Aspen.

It’s a very long and complicated process to get a new retail store up and running, so we opted instead to purchase one that already existed, Stash, located at 710 East Durant Avenue. Stash has been part of the story of cannabis in Aspen from the very start, being one of the very first retail outlets in the town when it opened on March 5, 2015. They made history when the first retail cannabis purchase in Pitkin County was made at Stash, and we couldn’t be happier to continue the relationship with the community they’ve developed over the last several years.

Here at Euflora, we’re known for providing a unique and comfortable experience (using tablets to browse the different strains we offer, for example), and we wanted to make sure to bring that to our new Aspen location. That’s why we spent $100,000 to remodel the store. Customers will be able to get the same exceptional customers service at our Aspen location that they’ve come to expect at all Euflora retail stores.

So far, the reception from locals has been excellent! “I always shopped at the Aurora Southlands Euflora location when I’d visit my family,” says Carbondale resident Jessica McSorber, “it’s fantastic that I’m now able to shop at Euflora right here near home.”

All of our daily and weekly specials are available at our new Aspen location, and you can get all of your favorite strains (Sour Diesel, Blue Dream, Island Sweet Skunk, and Jack Flash, to name a few).

We’d like to invite both locals and visitors to Aspen to stop by, meet our friendly budtenders, and visit us at our new store. We’re located just one block from the Silver Queen Gondola, and are open every day from 9:00am to 10:00pm. Hope to see you soon!


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April 17, 2018 administrator

We are very excited to announce our new location opening this spring in Longmont, Colorado.

Grand Opening April 27th!

250 S. Main Street Longmont, CO 80501

Hours of Operation:

9am-9:45pm Daily

Special Deals running through the weekend:

2 for $40 1g wax

2 for $20 Dixie Tarts

$.01 Joint with $50 purchase

$99 ounce and $20 1/8th on select strains

Thank you for all your support over the past 4 years as we expand throughout Colorado and beyond. Stay tuned for our locations in California


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March 2, 2018 administrator

It’s recommended that you should let at least four hours pass between the time you smoke marijuana and the time you drive a car. The window for taking marijuana orally is six hours. However, these guidelines come with a few caveats.

The Trouble With Guidelines
However, it’s difficult to set hard parameters for safe time passed between smoking marijuana and getting behind the wheel because the effects of marijuana vary widely according to potency and tolerance. They are, in short, dose-dependent. So while it is helpful to suggest a window of hours between smoking and driving, it’s even more useful to get into the details.

Don’t Be High
No one should drive while high. If you’re “a little high,” as measured by how strong your buzz is, you shouldn’t get behind the wheel. Many of us think we can drive with a slight high. The first parameter for safe time passed between smoking marijuana and driving is that you shouldn’t be high at all.

Don’t Be Overconfident
Smokers who drive can underestimate the time they need by forgetting these factors:

There is a period during which you might not be feeling the “high” — you’re no longer recreating with marijuana — but your senses and reflexes aren’t yet what you’d like them to be for getting behind the wheel.

There are levels of being “straight” after smoking that are appropriate to normal driving conditions but not for emergencies. Skidding on black ice or having to swerve away from a pedestrian stepping into the street from between two parked cars, for example. It’s usually recommended that eight hours should pass between the feeling of euphoria has passed and the moment you drive.

Notice that there’s a certain inconsistency between that recommendation and the one listed further above (that you shouldn’t drive for four hours after smoking).

When recommendations clash, it’s better to go with the more conservative option and decide that you shouldn’t drive for eight hours after smoking marijuana.
A smoker might handle his or her vehicle faultlessly but still be in legal trouble if something goes wrong completely beyond your control.

 

Marijuana, Driving, and the Law
Don’t make the mistake of thinking that because marijuana might now be legal in your state it’s legal to drive while high. Even if there hasn’t been an accident, if you’re pulled over while driving high you’ll be cited for Driving Under the Influence, just as though you had had a martini.

 

Laws vary from state to state. Some have a zero-tolerance policy, together with broad interpretive powers granted to the police officer who has pulled you over. Don’t be surprised if the mere presence of weed paraphernalia in your vehicle is enough for a judge to decide in favor of the officer even though you hadn’t smoked in several days.

Conclusion
Marijuana is criticized for leading to a sedentary lifestyle. When it comes to driving, let this criticism become sound advice. The safest place to be high is on your couch.


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