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January 4, 2019 administrator

With the ever expanding use cases of cannabis, from medical to industrial, a company in the Netherlands has built a prefab house… entirely out of cannabis!

The company, Dunagro,  has been developing a house made from hemp concrete (a mixture of hemp wood, natural glue and water), since 2009. Hemp, the non-THC variety of the cannabis plant has long been known to be useful in a myriad of applications that are both environmentally sustainable, fast growing, and cost efficient. From food to clothing to bio-fuel hemps uses continue to develop and that pace should speed up exponentially since it’s recent legalization in the USA.

 

Last November, Dun Agro put its hemp home on display. The company has already completed its second hemp home and has plans to build and sell more in the near future. In fact, with the present output of hemp in the Netherlands, the company estimates it can produce up to 500 hemp houses per year. If the demand increases, that number can easily be scaled up.

According to the company (translated to english):

“With this hemp house we show that, among other things through the use of innovative techniques, hemp building is a serious alternative to the sustainability of regular housing, also in terms of costs.”

 


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October 21, 2018 administrator

Cannabis is often in the news. There is much written about it being illegal, legal, or medically legal. There are articles on how it grows and how to get it to grow better. There are articles on how it’s a drug and how it’s a medicine. However, the piece that is rarely reported on is the components of cannabis, including THC, and how they make the body work.

The Use of Chemical Compounds by Plants

If a plant creates a compound that does not directly contribute to its ability to grow and reproduce, then there is usually an indirect reason for its production. The two main reasons that a plant will use an indirect chemical is to deter predators or to encourage pollinators and/or seed spreaders. Predators can be deterred by something that tastes bad, or by something toxic to them. Pollinators are drawn to showy flowers, and seeds that are surrounded by yummy fruit can be pooped out and spread the location of the plant. The book The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan suggests that the chemical compound of certain plants was used to entice people to spread them as well. Though the compounds in cannabis were originally used, most likely, to discourage insect predators, their effects on people had enough of an effect to spread this plant worldwide.

Why Chemicals Have an Effect on the Body

A chemical can only work in locations where there are receptors for the chemical. Receptors are locations on the body where, if the right thing is plugged in, something will happen. Depending on which of the compounds are plugged in, it works like a set of instructions to the body to release certain hormones, bring in blood cells, or allow for different brain pathways to change the processing of current information (this can result in a high, pain relief, memory loss or something else, depending on the compound). They are similar to the charge ports on today’s electronic devices. To get them to work, you need to have the right shape of port on your cord. In this case, the cord is THC or one of the other cannabis chemical compounds. Looking at the medical reason for it is like examining this natural wiring. Cannabis has two kinds of chemical compounds, called terpenes and cannabinoids. Terpenes are responsible for the different smells of the cannabis strains, while cannabinoids are responsible for the medical effects, as well as the high. Here is a look at the chemicals that are contained in cannabis, their effect on the body, and why they work that way:

THC

The most well-known chemical compound in cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. There are two varieties, known as 9-THC and 8-THC. This compound is known for its high, and because of this, cannabis has a very unique history in the plant world. While most plants which are used by people will be bred for the size, color, or taste of an item, cannabis was instead bred for the concentration of this chemical in the plant. Hemp, A different strain, subspecies or species, depending on who you talk to, was bred instead for the fibrous consistency and oil content of the plant. This means that the current day cannabis strains may be very different than those which were originally discovered in locations like Ancient Egypt. This is most concentrated in the plant’s flower buds, though it can be found, along with other compounds, in every part of the plant.

How THC works in the body

THC has two different receptor site location types. The first is located in the brain, where type CB1 receptors live, and the second is on some of the immune organs, like the spleen and lymph nodes. These are called type CB2 receptors. In type CB1, the high is found. In type CB2, there is the ability to suppress immune system function.

What Does the Body use CB1 and CB2 Receptors For?
It is important to note that the body does not have receptors, usually, to take in outside chemicals. Instead, these are areas that are activated by the body’s natural hormones in times of need. The change in perception created by type CB1 receptors have been shown by the body to be a coping mechanism for times of undue stress. The body can activate these during times of crisis or extreme physical exertion, like childbirth, in order to keep the full memory of the event from creating PTSD responses. The nausea center of the brain can also be tempered by THC, allowing an easier reaction from chemotherapy. CB2 receptors are immune suppression locations. When the body is in the middle of an autoimmune attack, where it is killing itself to fight an unseen enemy such as an allergy, these receptors can slow down the response and keep it from doing too much damage to the body. Medically, this receptor can theoretically be used to protect the body from foreign objects like surgical pins and even transplanted organs.

Other compounds in Cannabis:

The pharmacological uses for many of the other cannabinols have been of increasing interest as the allowance of cannabis for medical purposes has become more mainstream. Dozens of these compounds exist with a multitude of properties. Here is a small sampling of them and their medicinal applications:

  • Cannabichromene: This is the second most abundant cannabinol compound in the body. It affects the CB1 receptors by stimulating neurogenesis, or brain growth and fights depression. Its use of the same receptors along the spine can be a pain reliever. By way of the CB2, swelling or edema can be reduced. For those with digestive fungal and bacterial overgrowth, it also has an antifungal and antibacterial component. This can be found in all plant parts, and usually must be chemically extracted to use as an isolated compound.
  • Cannabidiol (CBD): This antioxidant stimulates the seizure center of the brain to stop convulsive attacks. It also seems to have anti-tumor properties. This is a nonpsychotic compound (no high) found in many parts of both cannabis and hemp, and often utilized through the oil.

The many effects of the cannabis compounds on the body are just beginning to be discovered. The vast knowledge of cultivation techniques to increase THC levels, taste varieties and other effects can also be used to design medical-centric cannabis strains designed for more effective treatment of certain conditions. Already this is being done to creates strains of cannabis that don’t give the high but do contain the other medically significant compounds. This particular science is in its infancy, though the knowledge of pharmacology and specific medical effects of different compounds will surely make this one of the fastest growing sectors of the cannabis industry.

Sources:
Pollan, Michael: The Botany of Desire
http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=000640
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydrocannabinol
Onaivi, Emmanuel: The Biology of Cannabis
http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=000636
http://www.leafscience.com/2013/09/21/5-health-benefits-of-cannabichromene-cbc/
http://www.leafscience.com/2014/02/23/5-must-know-facts-cannabidiol-cbd/


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August 21, 2018 administrator

There are thousands of strains out there, each with unique characteristics and effects. If you’re new to marijuana, it can feel overwhelming! It doesn’t have to be though. With a little bit of basic knowledge and a willingness to try new things, exploring the world of weed strains can be a blast. There’s a few things to think about before you walk in the door to your favorite Euflora location.

What effect are you looking for?

This is maybe the most important question to ask yourself when you’re choosing a strain. Cannabis strains fall into three categories: indica, sativa, and hybrids. Generally, if you’re looking for a relaxing feeling, you’ll go for an indica. An easy way to remember that is an Indica will put you In Da Couch. Sativas are known for the opposite; they’ll energize you and uplift you. Then there are hybrid strains, that all fall somewhere in the middle. So if you’re looking for something that’s going to be great during the daytime, or maybe a party with lots of friends, you’ll be better off with a sativa. If you need something to chill you out at the end of the night, or maybe help you sleep, that’s when you’d pick an indica.

What aroma do you like?

Each cannabis strain has a different “terpene profile”. Terpenes are essential oils found in the cannabis plant that are responsible for the scent and taste of the strain. (Specific terpenes are also sought for medical benefits, but that’s info for a different post). So much of the cannabis experience has to do with aroma. Just like tasting food or wine, you don’t get the full effect unless you can smell it! For example, strains high in A-Pinene will be piney and slightly woody. Caryophyllene will have a spicy, peppery aroma. Prefer something that smells citrusy? Try a strain that has a high quantity of linalool. When picking a cannabis strain, Euflora believes that being able to smell the flower first is extremely important. That’s why all our strains are presented in open-air, plexiglass containers, (accompanied by a description and additional information on iPads.)

Use the budtenders

You don’t have to figure this out on your own. Use the advice of our budtenders! Euflora’s budtenders are pros, that’s why they’re on the team. They know the details of each and every strain (and every product) that we offer. Talk to the budtenders about the kind of effects you’re looking for, and the type of scents that attract you. They’ll be able to guide you towards the perfect strain.

Remember, it’s not a race! Take your time reading about the different strains, smelling them, and asking the friendly Euflora budtenders lots of questions. Picking the right strain is part of the experience. There’s no need to rush it, and there’s no high-pressure sales tactics used in Euflora stores. We want you to enjoy the process!


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July 17, 2018 administrator

Cannabis extracts (also sometimes referred to by the term “concentrates”) can be intimidating and confusing for the newcomer. There are many different types, and they go in and out of style. It seems like there’s always something fresh popping up on the market! But don’t worry, we’ve done some of the background work for you. Below we’ve written a list of commonly found extracts with definitions. Treat this as a primer, and don’t be afraid to chat with our friendly Euflora budtenders for more guidance!

 

Wax – Wax is an extremely popular concentrate for dabbing. It is made by blasting plant material with solvent. Then, the material is heated at a low temperature while it’s whipped. Cannabis wax looks a bit like Cool Whip, but is a bit crumbly. It looks tasty, but don’t eat it!

 

Budder – Budder is very similar to wax but has more moisture in it. It isn’t whipped as much as wax when it’s being made, and has a more malleable and oily consistency.

 

Live Resin – This amazing innovation is made similar to how you’d make budder or wax, except your starting material is fresh-frozen plant. The flavor and aroma with live resin is fantastic, and this type of extract really captures the spirit of the live plant that it was made from. Ranging in color from light amber to yellow-gold, it often has a shiny, wet look to it.

 

Shatter – Shatter is one of the most popular types of extracts available today, and we believe that’s at least partly due to the way it looks… like shattered pieces of stain glass! Typically created by blasting plant material with butane, the extraction process used to make shatter removes the lipids and fats from the substance.

 

CO2 Oil – C02 oil is a type of concentrate that’s become popular over the years. It is viewed as a more natural substance since it’s made using C02 (which, of course, is a substance that occurs naturally and is produced by the human body). C02 oil is made with pressure and carbon dioxide to separate plant material. The finished product is usually an amber-colored oil. Typically, you’ll find C02 oil in vape cartridges.

 

Crumble – The process for making crumble is a lot like the way shatter is made, but the oils used to make crumble usually have a thicker consistency and more moisture, which contributes to giving this concentrate its cheese-like, crumbly body. When making crumble, lower heat is used (compared to shatter) which preserves more of the terpenes.

 

Bubble hash – You don’t see it as often as you used to, but bubble hash is still popular with DIYers and the slightly older crowd. Using ice water to separate plant matter from the THC, bubble hash can be mixed into joints, crumbled over a bowl, or even smoked by itself.

 

Rosin – Rosin has been around for as long as people have been smoking cannabis. In some parts of the world it’s the dominant method of consumption. Considered to be one of the most natural types of extracts, all it takes to create rosin is pressure and heat. Folks at home even make their own rosin with hair straighteners or tortilla presses! It usually has the appearance of amber-yellow sap.

 

Consider the above list to be just a primer. The cannabis concentrates world is deep and varied, and there is always something new to try. Don’t be intimidated! Our friendly budtenders will help you navigate, just stop by any Euflora location to get started!


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March 2, 2018 administrator

It’s recommended that you should let at least four hours pass between the time you smoke marijuana and the time you drive a car. The window for taking marijuana orally is six hours. However, these guidelines come with a few caveats.

The Trouble With Guidelines
However, it’s difficult to set hard parameters for safe time passed between smoking marijuana and getting behind the wheel because the effects of marijuana vary widely according to potency and tolerance. They are, in short, dose-dependent. So while it is helpful to suggest a window of hours between smoking and driving, it’s even more useful to get into the details.

Don’t Be High
No one should drive while high. If you’re “a little high,” as measured by how strong your buzz is, you shouldn’t get behind the wheel. Many of us think we can drive with a slight high. The first parameter for safe time passed between smoking marijuana and driving is that you shouldn’t be high at all.

Don’t Be Overconfident
Smokers who drive can underestimate the time they need by forgetting these factors:

There is a period during which you might not be feeling the “high” — you’re no longer recreating with marijuana — but your senses and reflexes aren’t yet what you’d like them to be for getting behind the wheel.

There are levels of being “straight” after smoking that are appropriate to normal driving conditions but not for emergencies. Skidding on black ice or having to swerve away from a pedestrian stepping into the street from between two parked cars, for example. It’s usually recommended that eight hours should pass between the feeling of euphoria has passed and the moment you drive.

Notice that there’s a certain inconsistency between that recommendation and the one listed further above (that you shouldn’t drive for four hours after smoking).

When recommendations clash, it’s better to go with the more conservative option and decide that you shouldn’t drive for eight hours after smoking marijuana.
A smoker might handle his or her vehicle faultlessly but still be in legal trouble if something goes wrong completely beyond your control.

 

Marijuana, Driving, and the Law
Don’t make the mistake of thinking that because marijuana might now be legal in your state it’s legal to drive while high. Even if there hasn’t been an accident, if you’re pulled over while driving high you’ll be cited for Driving Under the Influence, just as though you had had a martini.

 

Laws vary from state to state. Some have a zero-tolerance policy, together with broad interpretive powers granted to the police officer who has pulled you over. Don’t be surprised if the mere presence of weed paraphernalia in your vehicle is enough for a judge to decide in favor of the officer even though you hadn’t smoked in several days.

Conclusion
Marijuana is criticized for leading to a sedentary lifestyle. When it comes to driving, let this criticism become sound advice. The safest place to be high is on your couch.


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January 11, 2018 administrator

Euflora is very excited to be hosting the 2018 #MileHigh420Celebration in the heart of Denver, Colorado.

Stay tuned for artist lineup announcements, activities, and new additions to this year’s festival as we #reimagine420

If you haven’t been following the news here’s a good breakdown of what all went down, alas, Euflora has been granted the permit to put on the Denver 420 festival. The official name of the event is Mile High 420 Festival

please visit the official festival website here:

MILE HIGH 420 Festival

*Updates to follow… we will be updating this post here.*

Headline acts announced:

featuring Lil Wayne, Lil Jon, Inner circle and The Original Wailers!


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November 30, 2017 administrator
If you’ve been following the developments unfolding over the past month regarding Euflora’s efforts to obtain the permit to manage Denver’s annual 420 Festival, here’s an update.
The city of Denver essentially setup a race to the permit office at 8am on November 21. At the outset it sounded like an unorthodox but technically “fair” way to release the permit. The only problem was that the City had not informed their security team of the details and this lead to several massive failures on their end. Check out this Surveillance footage that shows how things went down: http://www.9news.com/news/surveillance-video-shows-two-teams-race-to-apply-for-denvers-420-permit/495074867

While this was a very unfortunate turn of events after camping out for 27 days to be first in line, we are still optimistic that the City will name us the rightful permit recipient after investigating the facts.

We ask you to help us keep this issue front and center by sharing this with whomever would enjoy it. It’s been a fascinating ride thus far and we want to make sure the City of Denver cannot ignore the glaring fact that this permit process was unorganized, unfair, and very poorly handled.

We are hopeful that this technicality is overturned and the City will do the right thing. We have faith that our elected officials will see the string of failures that led to someone else breaking the rules and being rewarded for doing so.

We believe that we are the only group in contention that can manage 420 properly, with the funds and experience to put together a world class event. In fact some of the very same players that created the debacle on 420 this past April are back again and working closely with Smokey and company. We feel that this is a liability for the city of Denver and something that should not be allowed to happen.

Stay tuned…

 

 


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August 12, 2017 administrator

Witness a true behind-the-scenes look at Euflora, one of Colorado’s best cultivation facilities and explore it’s dispensary to discover what this amazing grow house can produce.

This 2.5-hour cannabis excursion is an extraordinary opportunity to get a behind the scenes look at the Colorado Cannabis Industry. During the tour, you will be chauffeured throughout Denver in luxury 420 friendly transportation, where you can smoke, drink, eat, and enjoy. Your private driver will be equipped with smoking devices, bottled water, and snacks.

As if being transported through time and space, you will arrive at Euflora Dispensary’s 7,000 sq. ft. marijuana greenhouse where you can explore and learn about the cultivation of cannabis from clone to harvest and have all of your questions answered. This is a rare opportunity to learn about different grow rooms at different stages of cultivation and take pictures with big, beautiful, budding plants!

Then, get a chance to experience what this grow house produces when you get VIP access to Euflora’s Dispensary on Denver’s 16th Street Mall, where you will receive deep discounts on strains, topicals, edibles and more! Better yet, expert budtenders are available to guide your shopping experience and answer all of your questions about cannabis.

You must be 21 years of age to attend our experiences. Please make sure to bring your non-expired ID, or State issued License. Temporary IDs can not be used to validate entry into dispensaries and/or grow facilities. Also, vertical ID’s will not be accepted for entry into dispensaries and/or grow facilities. Non-US Citizens must present a valid passport to enter cannabis businesses. These are the rules of the Marijuana Enforcement Division.

Click Here to Book a Tour Now


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February 28, 2017 administrator

Press Secretary Sean Spicer threw cannabis advocates for a loop over his suggestion that the Justice Department is not on board with adult-use cannabis in the same way that it accepts, somewhat, the therapeutic uses of the plant for some ailments.

“There’s a big difference between (medical marijuana) and recreational marijuana, and I think when you see something like the opioid addiction crisis blossoming in so many states around this country, the last thing we should be doing is encouraging people,” Spicer said in the press room late February. “There is still a federal law that we need to abide by regarding recreational marijuana and other drugs of that nature,” Spicer continues.


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January 23, 2017 administrator

It’s been a promising start for the newly legal states that joined pot pioneers in Colorado, Oregon, DC, Washington, and Alaska by passing measures to legalize marijuana in November. Last year, Colorado’s cannabis industry brought in more than $270 million in the first quarter of 2016 alone. We exceeded preliminary estimates, and so did Washington. Now it’s California, Maine, Massachusetts, Arizona and Nevada’s time to shine. As of November, those are the next five states to open up the doors of a recreational marijuana market.

 

A new analysis from the Tax Foundation found nationwide legalization of marijuana could generate up to $28 billion in tax revenues (federal, state, and local). According to the report, that is:

  • $7 billion in federal revenue
  • $5.5 billion from business taxes
  • $1.5 billion from income, plus payroll taxes

 

To break that down further, here’s look at the potential prosperity dispensaries can help unlock in each state.

 

Arizona

Arizona’s Proposition 205 is a welcome accompaniment to the approved medical marijuana bill passed back in 1996. The 15 percent tax on retail sales, business licensing and state and local taxes will bolster the current tax revenue up to $82 million per year by 2020. That amount will go 50-50 to local jurisdictions for their education and public health programs.

 

California

California first approved medical marijuana in 1996 but rejected recreational twice, once in 1972 and again in 2010. The newly successful Proposition 64 ushers the state into the recreational market with an imposed 15 percent tax on retail marijuana sales. They will also tax at the processing and cultivation level, to the tune of  $9.25 per ounce on flowers and $2.75 for every ounce. Then comes the state and local sales taxes. The Tax Foundation estimates tax revenues in California will reach $646 million or more, and California has some impressive plans for all that money. The first $25 million raised will go to health and law enforcement related to cannabis legalization, and youth drug education and treatment. A further 40 percent of future revenue will be evenly split between environmental programs, and programs to reduce the incidents of driving under the influence.

 

Maine

Maine Question 1 was passed in November to expand on the medical marijuana bill passed in 1999. With an imposed 10 percent tax on retail sales, the state is estimating $10.7 million per year in tax revenues. Of that, 98 percent will enter a state general fund, with the remaining 2 percent going to local governments.

 

Massachusetts

Massachusetts Question 4 to expand the medical marijuana program that was opened up in 2012. Question 4 proposes a 3.75 percent tax on all cannabis retail sales, plus a state sales tax of 6.25 percent. What will they do with the $50 million per year that those taxes will bring? Some of it will go toward regulating their new market, and the rest will enter a state general fund.

 

Nevada

Nevada passed Question 2 in November after rejecting a medical marijuana bill in 2000 and another recreational bill in 2002. The bill proposed a 15 percent tax on wholesale marijuana sales, plus licensing fees, and retail-level state and local sales taxes. The expected revenue from this could be $48 million per year or more, conservatively speaking. Nevada plans to pour that revenue into administration, regulation, and some education funds.

 

To compare with the states mentioned, Colorado collected $63 million in tax revenue, plus $13 million in licenses and fees during 2014, the pilot year for totally legal adult cannabis use in the state. For more information on how Colorado spends it’s cannabis tax revenue, the Cannabist—a subsidiary of The Denver Post—wrote this piece that breaks the spending down.


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